Observations from Wiruna

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Observations from "Wiruna", Ilford NSW.

  • Feb 14th, 1999 - Andrew Murrell, 20" f/5 Dobsonian
  • Feb 15th, 1999 - Andrew Murrell, 20" f/5 Dobsonian
  • Feb 16th, 1999 - Andrew Murrell, 20" f/5 Dobsonian
  • Feb 17th, 1999 - Andrew Murrell, 20" f/5 Dobsonian
  • Feb 18th, 1999 - Andrew Murrell, 20" f/5 Dobsonian
  • Feb 19th, 1999 - Andrew Murrell, 20" f/5 Dobsonian
  • April 16th, 1999 - Andrew Murrell, 20" f/5 Dobsonian



















    Observations At Ilford - Feb 14th, 1999

    Andrew Murrell - 20" f/5 Dobsonian
    Trans:7, Seeing: 8
    No Dew, Slight Wind

    NGC 2818/A
    This Open Cluster appears rectangular in shape and contains about 50 - 60 stars. The average magnitude is between 12th and 14th. It's dimension are about 12' x 6'. There is no ocncentration in the centre of the cluster. Near the west edge of the cluster is a small planetary nebula of about 40". The nebula appears bipolar with a dark lane running through the middle along the east-west axis. The southern pole of the planetary appears brighter. The planetary responds well to the OIII filter, but the bipolar nature gets lost. The cluster is visible in a 90mm finder.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 28189 16.0-36.383649239'8.240starsPyxis11.32 bright star
    NGC 2818A9 16.0-36.3836492338"11.6PK261.9+8.5Pyxis *


    NGC 3087
    A compact galaxy about 1' diameter. It is fairly bright and has an almost stellar nucleus. No stars were seen near or over the face of the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 30879 59.2-34.133659212'11.7Antlia


    IC 2522 & IC 2523
    A great pair of galaxies. IC 2522 is a fairly bright face on spiral with a diameter of about 2.5'. The nucleus of the galaxy is quite bright. There appeared to be no stars around the galaxy. IC 2523 is an edge on galaxy a bit fainter than it's companion, and about 1.5' long. The 2 galaxies are separated by 4' South. Must come back and observe again.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag. Misc:Const:
    IC 25229 52.2-33.083658992.2' x 1.7'11.9SBcAntlia*
    IC 25239 52.2-33.083658991.3' x .5'12.8SBbcAntlia*


    NGC 3038
    A fairly bright galaxy with a very bright, almost stellar nucleus. From this bright nucleus, the halo of the galaxy steadily declines in brightness to the edge. The diameter of the galaxy is about 2.5'.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 30389 51.3-32.453658993' x 1.6'11.7SAbAntlia*


    IC 2531
    Fantastic! This is a thin edge on galaxy. It is fairly bright and almost 7' long. The nuclear bulge is compact taking about 1'. A 14th mag star sits on either end off the galaxy. Several 15-16 mag stars are embedded in the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    IC 25319 59.95-29.36:93658997' x .6'12Antlia*


    Observing ended due to cloud at about 1am. I rose again just before dawn and looked at Antares which split cleanly into the double star, the fainter a definite green colour. And then a look at Mars complete with Polar cap and dark marking on the limb pos Syrtis Major.


    Observations At Ilford - Feb 15th, 1999

    Andrew Murrell - 20" f/5 Dobsonian
    Trans:7, Seeing: 6
    Used M42 to assess seeing conditions
    No Dew, Slight Wind

    Pyxis Globular Cluster
    This is a small, low surface brightness cluster, visible only in large telescopes. It appears to ba 1' in diameter, with several 15th to 17th magnitude stars scattered across the face. It does not resolve, and has no brightening towards the centre. A 9th magnnitude star is positioned 4' Southeast of the cluster, while a 1th magnitude star is positioned 5' East. The cluster requires averted vision to initially locate, but oncve found it is visible directly.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    Pyxis Globular9 07.95-37.10364923Pyxis


    NGC 2845
    A 2' diameter galaxy with a brightening at the nucleus. It appears round - possibly elliptical or face-on spiral. A faint star is positioned 30" SE of the nucleus of the galaxy. No other stars are visible near the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 28459 18.6-38.003649232 x 112.7SAOVela


    NGC 2833
    A faint galaxy with no nucleus and an even surface brightness. It's dimensions apear to be 2' x 1'. A 15th mag star is positioned 30"SE of where the nucleus should be. Several 15-16th mag stars lie on the SW edge of the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 28339 25.2-34.053649232' x 0.7'15.2IM PecPyxis


    NGC 2904
    A fairly bright galaxy about 2' x 1.5' with a brightening toward the nucleus, otherwise the surface brightness is even. A star of 13.5 mag lies about 20" West of the nucleus. Another 16th mag star lies on the Western edge of the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 29049 30.2-30.233649001.4' x 1'12.7SAB0Antlia


    IC 2448
    A compact bright planetary nebula about 20" diameter. No central star is visible. Averted vision shows a pale aqua colour to the disk. The planetary has an even surface brightness and no visible structure. The edge of the planetary dies appear fuzzy. A very nice Planetary Nebula.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    IC 24489 07.1-69.5744810178"10.4~285.7 -14.9 *Carina


    ESO 60 IG26
    "Madore's Monster". This galaxy appears to be actually 3 separate galaxies interacting. As a whole, it appears to be 3' x 1.5' across with a low surface brightness. There are no stars near the galaxies, or scattered across the face. Averted vision shows 2 distinct dark patches, separating the galaxy into 3 objects. Very Interesting.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    ESO 60 IG264481017Carina


    Observing finished due to cloud cover. Shane Supple arrived about 11pm, and I wen tover some of the objects listed again.


    Observations At Ilford - Feb 16th, 1999

    Andrew Murrell - 20" f/5 Dobsonian
    Trans:8, Seeing: 7
    No Dew, Slight Wind

    PK 264 -8.1
    A compact planetary nebula of even surface brightness. No central star is visible. Diameter of about 20". The nebula is difficult at low power. At high power, the edge appears fuzzy. It responds well to the OIII filter, but does not change in appearance.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    PK 264 -8.18 11.5-48.4339+696646"12.4~He2-7/264 -8.1 *Vela*


    NGC 3195
    A possible annular planetary nebula, 30" in diameter. It appears brighter on the eastern edge of the nebula. A 14th mag star is positioned on the western edge of the nebula. The OIII filter responds very well. This nmakes the planetary appear slightly larger, and makes the annular shape easier to pick out. The overall shape is slightly flattened from round.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 319510 09.5-80.52465102438"11.6296.6 -20.0Chameleon*


    NGC 3149
    This galaxy appears larger than shown on the map. It is about 5' in diameter, appearing as a face-on spiral. There is a noticable brightening towards the nucleus, while the rest of the galaxy has a fairly even surface brightness. A 15th mag star lies on the northern edge of the nucleus. No other stars about.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 314910 13-80.24465?1024Chameleon


    E3
    A very faint globular cluster, it appears as a 3' diffuse patch of sky, slightly brighter than the background. First found using averted vision, I was later able to find it using direct vision. There appears to be no central condensation, and it does not resolve. No starts are visible superimposed over the cluster either. Best found using a finder chart. I was using a MegaStar chart. Best viewed at 230x.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    E39 20.59-77.174651025Chameleon


    Abell 30
    A 90" diameter faint planetary nebula. Direct vision did not show the planetary, but using an OIII filter, I was able to find it. The nebula appeared round and had no structure visible. A 14th mag star was positioned on the western edge while a 16th mag star was embedded in the enbula itself. No central star was visible.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    Abell 308 46.8+17.53186/7712109"15.5~208.5+33.2Cancer*


    IC 2409
    The standard "run-of-the-mill" faint galaxy. Appears to be about 40" diameter with an even surface brightness. No nucleus is visible, and no stars are on or near the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    IC 24098 48.8+18.20187712Cancer


    NGC 2672/3
    A fairly bright pair of interacting galaxies. NGC 2672 is the fainter of the 2 galaxies and is about 2.5' across. The nucleus of the galaxy is quite bright and compact. A 14th mag star lies 30" west of the nucleus. NGC 2673 is a compact galaxy of about 30" diameter, found on the eastern edge of NGC 2672. This galaxy appears to be almost all nucleus. Both galaxies' outer halo's appear to mingle.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 26728 49.3+19 041427123' x 2.8'11.7E1Cancer*
    NGC 26738 49.4+19 04142712.8' x .8'13.3E0 PecCancer*


    NGC 2392
    The Eskimo Nebula. This is a very bright planetary nebula, and is visible as a stellaer point in a 90mm finder. A fairly large planetary with a 50" disk. The central star is very bright at 11th mag. The disk is broken into 2 parts; the inner annular ring and the outer halo. the inner ring is an intense aqua colour, even with direct vision. The details that are reported with the inner ring must only be visible under better seeing. The outer ring appeared "fluffy", for want of a better word. This area was also a pale aqua with averted vision. The Eskimo is one of the better planetaries. The inner ring also appears slightly oval and is about 30" across.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 23927 29.2+20 5513917650"9.2Cent. Star 10.5magGemini*



    Observations At Ilford - Feb 17th, 1999

    Andrew Murrell - 20" f/5 Dobsonian
    Trans:8, Seeing: 7
    No Dew, Slight Wind

    NGC 2371/2
    An unusual planetary nebula in Gemini. The double lobe nature of the planetary also led to it's double classification. In fact, it looks more like a pair of galaxies than a planetary nebula. The central star is just visible through the 2 lobes. Overall, it appears round with a diameter of about 60" and is quite bright. Using the OIII filter, the western edge appears marginally brighter. The planetary reacts well with the filter.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 2371/27 25.6+29 2910013055"11.3Cent. Star 14.8 mag, ~189.1+19.8Gemini*


    NGC 2257
    A globular cluster of the LMC variety. It is fairly large with a diameter of 2'. The cluster has an even surface brightness with no concentration toward the centre. The cluster is well detached from the background sky. Several 16th mag stars lie on the western edge of the cluster, while two 14th mag stars are found on the eastern side. The cluster does not resolve, but it does become grainy at 230x.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 22576 30.4-64 194454832.2'13.5Dorado


    Pal 3
    Another globular cluster about 1.5' diameter and a very low surface brightness. No concentration toward the nucleus was noted. A 14th mag star is positioned just off the SW edge of the cluster. The cluster does not reslove into stars. It is best viewed using averted vision. Due to it's low surface brightness, it is best found using a finder chart. I used one created by MegaStar and it was accurate.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    Pal 310 05.5+00 042357802.8'13.9Sextans*


    Sextans A
    This galaxy was once thought to be a member of the Local Group. New observations of it's radial velocity have determined that it is just outside. It is a large dwarf galaxy measuring 5' diameter. The low surface brightness makes it difficult to find. The galaxy has no nucleus visible, but a 13th mag star lies very close to where it would be. A 14th mag star lies on the eastern edge of the galaxy. It does not appear round, but more oval in shape. It is easier to observe than most dwarf galaxies in or near the Local Group.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    Sextans A10 11.1-4 432348045.9' x 4.9'11.5IBM V-V1 ~MCG1-26-30Sextans*


    NGC 3115
    A Great Galaxy. This edge-on galaxy has a very bright, almost stellar nucleus with a pronounced bulge. The galaxy measures 7' x 1.5' with the outer regions also quite bright. No other structure is visible in the galaxy. The northeastern edge if the galaxy is sharp edged and well defined against the background. No stars are visible in or around the galaxy. The galaxy is visible in a 90mm telescope.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 311510 05.2-7 432798048' x 2.8'8.9S0Sextans


    M 68
    A very nice globular cluster. It is 6' in diameter, and well resolved. A slight concentration towards the centre of the cluster is visible. It appears well detached from the background sky, as it is very bright. The northern edge of the cluster appears flattened slightly. The brightest stars appear to be about 13th mag, so it should be visible in a 10" telescope. The cluster is visible in the 90mm finder.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    M 6812 39.5-26 4532986912'7.7Bright star 12.6mag
    ~NGC 4590
    Hydra


    NGC 3242
    The "Ghost Of Jupiter". "WOW"! Best Planetary! This planetary is about 1' in diameter. The central star is very bright at 12th mag. It is very bright, and has a strong blue colour. The planetary is broken into 2 parts; the inner and the outer ring. The outer ring is diffuse with little structure, and an even surface brightness. The colour here is a pale aqua, even with direct vision. The inner ring is annular but not round, more oval in appearance. This inner ring is about 20" in diameter and is very bright, showing a strong aqua colour to a deep blue with direct vision. The eye seems drawn to the central star with direct vision. This makes the outer halo fade, leaving the inner ring prominent. The overall appearance of NGC 3242, is an eye looking back at you with the central star becoming the iris. I did not use the OIII filter. This planetary is visible in the 90mm finder.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 324210 24.8-18 3832585140"7.8Central Star 12.1mag
    261.0+32.0
    Hydra*


    M 53
    The globular cluster in Coma Berenices. Visually, the cluster is about 7' in diameter, and is well and truly resolved in the 20" scope. The brightest stars appear to be between 13th and 14th mag, with the majority of the stars being 16th mag. The cluster has a strong concentration of stars in the centre. It's high surface brightness makes this an easy cluster to find as it is visible in the 90mm finder. The cluster should start to resolve in an 8" telescope.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    M 5313 12.9+18 1019569912.6'7.5Bright Star 13.8mag
    NGC 5024
    Coma Berenices


    NGC 5053
    Similar in size to M 53, and located about 1.5° SE of that cluster. This cluster is much fainter than M 53 though. It appears as a 6' smudge of 15th to 16th mag stars. It is fully resolved into stars in the 20" scope. No concentration of stars in the centre of the cluster was visible, and the cluster had a definite oval shape. Due to it's low surface brightness, the cluster is difficult to pick from the background sky. This cluster would be a good challenge for an 8" telescope, and may only resolve in 14" and larger telescopes.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 505313 16.4+17 4219569910.5'9.9Bright Star 14th magComa Berenices


    NGC 3109
    This galaxy is called "The Wisp", and you can see why! It is an extremely low surface brightness galaxy measuring 20' x 4'. A 12th mag star marks the centre of the galaxy. Several field stars are scatterred throughout the galaxy. It reminds me of a very faint NGC 55. There is no nucleus to the galaxy at all, infact, there are no bright spots anywhere. This galaxy is very close to the Local Group, as it resolves into individual stars in professional photographs.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 310910 03.1-26 0932487616' x 2.9'9.8SBM IV-VHydra


    Antlia Dwarf
    This is a Local Group Galaxy. Measuring 3' x 2', it is quite bright for a Local Dwarf. There is a slight brightening in the centre of the galaxy. There appears to be no stars across the face of the galaxy. A 16th mag star is positioned on the northern edge and southern edge of the galaxy. The galaxy's large size with it's brightness, makes this a good test galaxy for a 12" telescope.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    Antlia Dwarf10 04.1-27 11324876Antlia*


    NGC 3132
    "The Eight Burst Nebula". This is an unusual planetary nebula. It is roughly egg shaped with a bright central star about 13th mag. The outer edge of the nebula is the brightest, which makes it look annular. It is a pale aqua through the 20" telescope. At high power, the outer edge of the nebula is very irregular in shape, with what look like tendrils eminating from the ring. The nebula responds very well to high power. No OIII filter was used. A very nice planetary. The angular size of the planetary is about 40".

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 313210 07.1-41 2639994130"9.7Central Star 10.07Vela*



    Observations At Ilford - Feb 18th, 1999

    Andrew Murrell - 20" f/5 Dobsonian
    Trans:8.5, Seeing: 7

    MCG 2-15-11
    A Galaxy of about 1.5' diameter with an even surface brightness showing only a slight brightening towards the nucleus. It appears slightly oval in shape. There is a 14th mag star on the eastern edge of the galaxy. There is also a 13.5mag star 1' west of the galaxy's edge. No stars can be seen across the face of the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    MCG 2-15-115 50.54-14 46.4627030113.8SBSLepus


    MCG 3-15-6
    A very sall galaxy about 30" across and quite faint. Either the galaxy has a ver bright nucleus or there is a star superimposed where the nucleus should be. It appears to be about 14th mag. The galaxy appears to be round. a 12th mag star is located 1' SW of the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    MCG 3-15-65 36.53-15 12.15302RSBROLepus


    NGC 1954
    A 4.5' diameter galaxy with a bright compact nucleus. It appears almost stellar and about 13.5 mag. A possible bar is associated with the galaxy. The outer halo gradually fades to the background sky. The bar appears oriented SW/NE. Two 13th mag stars lie in the NE section of the galaxy. A very good looking galaxy. Two companion galaxies lie on either side of NGC 1954. The galaxy to the SE is quite small, about 30" diameter and appears round. No structure is visible in the galaxy, but there is a notable brightening towards the nucleus. The galaxy to the NW is about 1.5' x 20". It appears as an edge on galaxy. The nucleus is quite bright. No stars appear associated.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 19545 32.8-14 04 271 302 4.2' x 2.0'11.8 SAb Lepus
    IC 21325 32.28-13 55.4 271 302 1.6' x .8'13.8 SB Lepus Galaxy SE? Not in the RC3


    IC 418
    The Red Planetary. This compat planetary is quite unusual when viewed through a large aperture telescope. It is quite compact, being about 30" in diameter. the central star is very bright at about 12th mag. Direct vision reveals an annular ring planetary with a pale crimson colour. The averted vision view shows a solid planetary of even brightness with a slight aqua colour and a prominent central star. The outer edge of the planetary appears to be the brightest section. IC418 is visible in the 90mm as an 11th mag star. I did not observe the nebula with the OIII filter. This is a must view planetary nebula!

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    IC 4185 27.5-12 42 270 12" 9.3 Central Star 10.17 *


    NGC 1888/9
    An interesting pair of interacting galaxies.
    NGC 1888 is an edge on galaxy with a large nuclear bulge. The core of the nucleus is quite bright. The outer arms extend to about 3' with averted vision. The NE edge of the galaxy has a sharp edge.
    NGC 1889 is a compact galaxy, 20" diameter, just north of the nucleus of NGC 1888. The nucleus of NGC 1889 appears to reside in theouter halo of NGC 1888. There were no stars associated with the galaxies.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 18885 22.5-11 30 270 3.0' x 1.2'11.9 Sb
    NGC 18895 22.5-11 29 270 .6' x .4'13.3 SAB


    NGC 1784
    A good sized galaxy measuring about 3' x 2' and has a reasonably bright nucleus. The outer halo of the galaxy is quite faint, with an even surface brightness. Several 14th and 15th mag stars are scattered across the face of the galaxy. The nuclear bulge of the galaxy appears bar-like; it may be a barred spiral galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 17845 05.4-11 52 270 4.6' x 2.7'11.7 SB(r)C


    MCG 2-14-4
    This galaxy has a diameter of 2' and appears round. The galaxy has an even surface brightness, with a slight brightening of the nucleus. A 14th mag star is positioned on the SW edge of the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    MCG 2-14-4


    NGC 1821
    A very compact galaxy with a diameter of 40". The nucleus of the galaxy is stellar and is about 15th mag. The halo that surrounds this bright nucleus has a very low surface brightness. No stars were otherwise associated with this galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 182105 11.7-15 07 270 1.3' x .7'13.5 IBM


    IC 2165
    A very nice compact planetary nebula. It has diameter of 10" and is round in appearance. The nebula has an even surface brightness, and no central star was visible. No internal structure in the nebula was apparent. The planetary is easily visible with direct vision, as it is very bright. To the averted eye, the planetary appeared a pale aqua colour. This colour was lost with direct vision.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    IC 216506 21.7-12 59 272 4"10.6 Central Star 14.99


    RU 1
    This grouping of stars barely counts as an open cluster. It appears as a scattering of 13th and 14th mag stars numbering about 20 members in total. All the stars gave an even colour. Many 16th and 17th mag stars form a backdrop for the cluster. Due to the number of scatterred stars of similar mag in the field, I would have to say that the cluster was poorly detached from the background sky.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    RU 16 36.4-14 11 272 11' 15 stars in cluster


    The Red Rectangle
    This star in Canis Major is about 12th mag. At high power, the star appears as a 3" red/orange nebula, which just becomes noticable. The red rectangle is a proto-planetary where the parent red giant is blowing off its outer atmosphere. This acocunts for he red/orange colour. Seeing restricted higher magnification from being used. No other details could be seen.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    The Red Rectangle


    NGC 1808
    A great visual Galaxy! It has a definite spiral shape, with a very bright nucleus and an almost stellar core. The bar of the galaxy is oriented almost N/S. The bar to the North curls West to the brighter of the 2 spiral arms. The curve in the Southern arm is not easy to spot. The spiral arms are quite faint. The angular diameter appears to be 5' x 3'. A 15th mag star lies just north of the nucleus, slightly West of the bar. This is a very nice galaxy, and shows good detail.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 180805 07.7-37 31 358 5.2' x 2.3'9.9 SBa


    End of observing - seeing deteriorated and light cloud came in.

    Observations At Ilford - Feb 19th, 1999

    Andrew Murrell - 20" f/5 Dobsonian
    Trans:6.5, Seeing: 5.5 - 3 at end

    NGC 1543
    A reasonably bright galaxy measuring 3' x 1'. It has a very bright, almost stellar nucleus, with a bright nuclear bulge. The outer halo has an even surface brightness. No stars are visible across the face of the galaxy. A 12th mag star is situated only 5' SW from the edge of the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 154304 12.8-57 44420 7.2' x 4.9'9.7SB(s)0
    Bar=2.5' x 1.0'


    NGC 1574
    A small galaxy about 1.5' diameter with a noticable nucleus. The general surface brightness is low, making it a galaxy which would be a good challenge for a 10" scope. A 12th mag star is positioned on the Eastern edge of the galaxy, while a 16th mag star is located about 30" East of the nucleus, in the faint halo.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 157404 22.1-56 58420 4.0' x 3.6'10.2SA(s)0


    IC 2056
    A small, 1' galaxy with no nucleus. No stars are positioned over the galaxy, but a 13th mag star is 5' North of the galaxy. The galaxy has an even surface brightness and is easy to find, as it is reasonably bright.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    IC 205604 16.5-60 13420 1.8' x 1.5'11.6Sab


    NGC 1672
    Appears to be a barred spiral galaxy showing easy spiral structure. The arm to the East is the brightestand has two 13th mag stars placed along it. The Western arm is fainter, but still visible with direct vision. The outline of the Western arm is quite diffuse. Several 15th and 16th mag stars lie scattered across the face of the galaxy. The bar of the galaxy is about 5' long with a very bright nucleus. This galaxy may show its spiral nature to a 12" telescope. A very nice galaxy to come back to!

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 167204 45.7-59 15421 6.2' x 3.4'9.8SABbc


    NGC 1688
    An unusual galaxy. The overall impression is a round object about 2' diamater with a bar and nucleus dissecting the galaxy oriented North/South. This bartr is a prominent feature of the galaxy and is quite bright. A 16th mag star sits on the Eastern edge of the galaxy. Averted vision shows a faint halo surrounding the entire galaxy. The nucleus of the galaxy has a star positioned just beside it, making the galaxy appear to have a double nucleus.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 168804 48.4-59 48421 2.5' x 1.4'12.0SBdm


    NGC 1703
    A round galaxy with a 1.5' diameter. The galaxy has an even surface brightness, with only a slight hint of a nucleus. A 12th mag star lies just off the Northern edge of the galaxy. No other stars were visible in or around the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 170304 52.8-59 45421 2.8' x 2.6'11.6SAc


    NGC 1824
    A fairly bright galaxy measuring about 2' x 5'. It has an even surface brightness, and did not appear to have a nucleus. There were no stars visible across the galaxy, but a 9th mag star was located 7' South of the galaxy. The galaxy's orientation appeared to be almost North/South.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 182405 06.9-59 43421 3.2' x .7'12.6SBm


    ESO 209-G9
    A low surface brightness, large galaxy measuring about 5' long, and about 40" wide. This galaxy is difficult to observe, due to the prescence of an 8th mag double-star, 10' South. Try to keep the stars out of the field whilst observing. A star of 14th mag lies on the Northern end of the galaxy, while several 15th to 17th mag stars are scattered across the face. No nucleus was seen and the galaxy appeared to have an even surface brightness. A very nice galaxy, and a must to come back to!

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    ESO 209-G9


    NGC 2292/3/5
    A good triplet of galaxies. NGC 2292/3 is a very close pair of galaxies, separated by about 1'. NGC 2292 has a low surface brightness, and no noticable nucleus. The diameter is 1.5'. NGC 2293 is similar in size and brightness to NGC 2292. This galaxy has a bright nucleus though. Several stars are scattered across the face of the pair. 8' West of the galaxies, is NGC 2295, a very compact galaxy about 40" across. Due to it's size, the galaxy has a fairly high surface brightness. No nucleus is visible. A pair of 15.56 mag stars are positioned at either end, North and South of the galaxy

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 229206 47.6-26 45318 4.2' x 2.3'10.8SAB0
    NGC 229306 47.7-26 45318 4.3' x 3'10.7SAB0
    NGC 229506 47.3-26 45318 2.4' x .7'Sab


    NGC 2280
    This appears as an adge on galaxy measuring 3' x 1'. The bright nucleus of the galaxy is elongated, with the outer regions of the galaxy fading in brightness. The edge of the galaxy was quite diffuse. A number of 16th and 17th mag stars were embedded in the galaxy, and 4 stars between 13th and 14th mag surrounded the galaxy.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 228006 44.8-27 38318 6.3' x 2.8'10.5


    NGC 2867
    A small bright planetary with a diameter of 20". It has an even surface brightness. No central star was visible. The planetary appeared round, even with high magnification. At low power, the planetary had a very pale aqua colour which was lost when observing above 200x. The visibility of colour in the planetary makes this quite an intersting object. Will come back and observe again!

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    NGC 286709 21.4-58 19425 11"9.7Central Star 15.0


    IC 2501
    Another compact planetary. This one appears as a 12th mag star at low power. Higher power reveals a planetary of about 5" diameter. The high surface brightness makes the planetary reveal an aqua colour at low power. The colour here is quite intensified when using direct vision. Direct vision though, makes the planetary fade quite dramatically. Again, a must come back to planetary. No central star is visible.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    IC 250109 38.8-60 05426 25"10.4 Central Star 14.48


    PK 279 -3.1
    A small 10" planetary with a very low surface brightness. It is not visible without an OIII filter. The filter shows the planetary with averted vision. A 16th mag star appears to lie on the Northern edge of the object. Due to the low surface brightness, it is difficult to judge the shape of the planetary, but it does appear round. No central star was detected.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    PK 279 -3.109 43.4-57 17426 25"11.8Central Star 11.37


    Observing session ended about 2.30am.

    Observations At Ilford - April 16th, 1999

    Andrew Murrell - 20" f/5 Dobsonian
    Trans:7 - 0 at times, Seeing: 8 - 9.5 at times

    The Homunculus
    The Homunculus, around the star Eta Carinae is an envelope of stellar material that was thrown off the star about a century ago. This is the only nebula that shows obvious colour. It appears bright orange, which is very striking against the sky background. The initial observation was with low power. This shows the surrounding emission nebula NGC 3372, an object that defies description. The Homunculus appears as a peanut-shaped orange blob, very bright, just near The Keyhole. The view at 300x shows great detail.

    It apears as bright as a bright hazy star with a bubble or lobe of material on either side, oriented SW/NE. The lobe to the SW is the brightest and reveals it's granular nature with a dark lane running through the middle and curling to the South at the end. The NE lobe is quite a bit fainter, and shows no internal detail. From the middle, an arm appears to protrude to the North. This jet of material is about 5" long. The overall size of the Homunculus is 30" diameter.

    Averted vision at this magnification intensifies the colour and shows a bright patch or knot 5" North of the star's(?) position. This bright know is only a couple of arc seconds across. By increasing the magnification to 720x, even more detail was glimpsed. In the moments of perfect seeing, the granulation in the NE lobe became aparent. The bright know became visible with direct vision. The Homunculus's orange colour remained. The dark lane glimpsed in the SW lobe, lost some of it's structure though, looking more like a meandering dark lane, ending in a small black spot about 5" from the Southern edge of the nebula.

    The high magnification creates a black background, giving very good contrast. The edge of the object remains sharp across the entire perimiter. What became most noticable now, was a faint halo surrounding the entire homunculus which doubled its apparent size. This diffuse glow had an indistince edge, and appeared to be evenly distributed around the object. No details were seen in this envelope. A right-angled triangle of 15th mag stars are located about 15" NW of the middle of the Homunculus, giving a nice contrast to the view at this power.

    As a side note to this observation, I noticed that several bright 8th - 10th mag stars showed diffraction rings around the stars. One complete ring and two partial rings were visible.

    Changing back to 300x, I looked for the halo, but was unable to see it, possibly due to the glare from the emission nebula and from Eta Carinae itself.

    This object goes down as the BEST thing to look at in the Southern skies. Where else can you see an orange nebula in a 10"telescope? The Homunculus is visible as a 6.5 mag star in my 90mm finder.

    A Truly Awesome Object... “WOW”!!!!

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    The Homunculus 10 45.36-59 41.3427 6.5Eta CarinaeCarina


    Palomar 5
    The Palomar globulars can be quite faint. This cluster fits that bill. The cluster was only visible with averted vision at 150x. It appeared to be about 3' across, and had a surface brightness just above that of the background sky. The cluster was so difficult to observe, that I will have to re-observe it to confirm my observations. The finder chart produced from MegaStar was definitely required to find the cluster. Due to its low surface brightness, no structure was visible.

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    Pal 5


    M5 (NGC 5904)
    This cluster lies a couple of degrees North of Pal 5, and is a complete contrast to that cluster. M5 looks like two clusters, rolled into one. A bright central region of 5' - 6' diameter is well resolved into 13th and 14th mag stars with a hint of condensation in the middle. The overall diameter of the cluster is about 20'. The concentrated central area appears almost gold in colour. The outer area of the cluster is filled with fainter 15th - 17th mag stars. The cluster looks unsymetrical, as the central region is offset from the fainter halo, moved slightly to the West. The Western edge of the cluster appears to be slightly flattened. The Eastern edge has large loops of stars that form definite chains. These loops of stars are also visible to the North of the cluster. All in all, a very nice cluster!

    Name:R.A.Dec.Urano.:Mill.:Size:Mag.Misc:Const:
    M5 (NGC 5904)


    Observations were halted due to heavy fog, but we continued to observe Mars through the haze at 1308x, using 2 Barlows. Heavy dew then settled and finished the night's observing.